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Wisconsin roundup: Trump unloads on Harley-Davidson ahead of Wis. visit; more state news stories

President Donald Trump, shown here last week during a visit to Duluth, Minn., this week criticized Wisconsin's Harley-Davidson for moving production overseas in the wake of tariff issues. Forum News Service photo

President Donald Trump stepped up his criticism of Harley-Davidson on Tuesday, suggesting that if the company moves, “they will be taxed like never before!”

Tuesday’s tweet comes one day after Trump used the social media app to say he is surprised the Wisconsin-based business is the first to "waive the white flag" over European tariffs. The motorcycle maker announced Monday it would shift production overseas after the European Union began putting tariffs into place last week.

Those moves come in response to duties the Trump administration put on European steel and aluminum. Harley-Davidson sold almost 40,000 motorcycles in the European Union last year and the United States was the only market which bought more of its products.

The Harley-Davidson flap comes just days ahead of Trump’s planned visit Thursday to Mt. Pleasant, where he is expected to join Gov. Scott Walker and leaders from Foxconn, as the Taiwanese business breaks ground on its $10 billion facility.

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Judge gives woman 9 months after prosecution recommends community service

An Eau Claire woman is going to jail for nine months after she was convicted of five felony charges, including lewd and lascivious behavior.

Prosecutors had recommended a sentence of community service for Amy Lew. Authorities began receiving complaints three years ago about videos posted online showing a woman performing sexually explicit acts in public places and businesses in Eau Claire. In the videos, Lew called herself "Whitney Wisconsin." She told the court her fiance, Erio Oliver, recorded the videos and sold them online. Oliver faces 20 counts of child porn possession and is scheduled to return to court in October.

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Walker announces $500K grant for Great Lake Cheese Co. in Wausau

Gov. Scott Walker used 'Wisconsin Cheese Day' to announce a $500,000 state grant for the Great Lakes Cheese Co.

The funding will be used to assist the company in training workers for its $74 million facility under construction in Wausau. Walker said "we applaud Great Lakes Cheese for not only investing in our state, but for investing in its workers." The governor says the state's unemployment rate is so low Wisconsin has begun looking to neighboring states to fill jobs. The 180,000-square foot plant is expected to open in 2019 and create about 200 new jobs over the next three years.

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Prosecutor has sympathy for Dassey

The special prosecutor who sent Brendan Dassey and his uncle to prison for killing a freelance photographer says he has a great deal of sympathy for Dassey.

The U.S. Supreme Court has decided it won't review Dassey's appeal of his conviction. Special prosecutor Ken Kratz tweeted Monday that Dassey's family and attorneys gave him the worst possible advice. Had he accepted the original plea offering, Dassey would be eligible for parole in three years. Now, the 28-year-old inmate won't be eligible for release until 2048. Kratz says he wonders if the "advisors" who criticized law enforcement for the way it got his confession will now apologize to Dassey for mishandling his case.

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Former Superior council member can remove felony from record by behaving

If a former Superior City Council member complies with the terms of his probation for four years, the felony charge against him will be reduced to misdemeanor disorderly conduct.

Twenty-seven-year-old Graham Franklin Garfield was accused of pointing a loaded gun at his fiancee in April 2017. The incident happened just a few days after Garfield had been re-elected to a second term on the city council. He resigned about two weeks later. Garfield will spend 30 days in jail after pleading no contest to a felony charge of recklessly endangering safety in Douglas County Circuit Court Monday.

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Police look for man who tried abducting teenage girl

A Madison teenager says a man grabbed her arm and offered her a ride on the city's west side Monday afternoon.

The girl tells investigators a man 30-to-40 years old said hi to her on the sidewalk as they passed. She says she kept walking but realized the man seemed to be following her after saying, "Hi." She says he stopped her in front of Little Caesar's Pizza and offered to buy her a pizza, then grabbed her arm and said something like "let's go for a ride." When a passerby shouted, "Let her go," the suspect did so and the girl ran away. Police are looking for the suspect in what is being called an attempted abduction.

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UW-Madison police make arrest in alleged child abuse case

A Madison man is under arrest for the alleged abuse of a 13-year-old boy.

UW-Madison police say the victim reported Sunday that he was assaulted and strangled by his mother's boyfriend. Officers found the boy with significant injuries to his face and arms and chest and abdomen pain. He was taken to the hospital for treatment, but 37-year-old Mark Shawanokasic was nowhere to be found. An officer saw Shawanokasic driving on the UW campus Sunday night and arrested him. He was booked on suspicion of child abuse, disorderly conduct and strangulation. Investigators say Shawanokasic is not affiliated with the University of Wisconsin.

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Wis. congressman to introduce bill eliminating ICE

Wisconsin Congressman Mark Pocan plans to introduce legislation in the U.S. House this week that would abolish Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE).

He recently returned from the southern border where he witnessed the nation's immigration crisis. Pocan said in a statement, "from conducting raids at garden centers and meatpacking plants, to breaking up families at churches and schools, ICE is tearing families apart and ripping at the moral fabric of our nation." His bill would dismantle ICE and create a commission to provide recommendations to Congress on how the government can implement what he calls "a humane immigration and enforcement system that upholds the dignity of all individuals."

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